Reviews – takahē 84

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The Land Ballot, by Fleur Adcock
reviewed by Janet Wainscott

Drowning City, by Ben Atkin
reviewed by Jane Orchard

waha/mouth, by Hinemoana Baker
reviewed by Sue Wootton

Bullet hole riddle, by Miriam Barr
reviewed by Mary Cresswell

Dear Neil Roberts, by Airini Beautrais
reviewed by Janet Newman

Mean, by Michael Botur
reviewed by Patricia Prime

The Red Queen, by Gemma Bowker-Wright
reviewed by Laura Borrowdale

Wonky Optics, by Geoff Cochrane
reviewed by Patricia Prime

Astonished Dice: Collected Short Stories, by Geoff Cochrane
reviewed by Justin Harrison

The Lonely Nude, by Emily Dobson
reviewed by Janet Newman

The Conch Trumpet, by David Eggleton
reviewed by Patricia Prime

Conversation by Owl-Light, by Alexandra Fraser
reviewed by Mary Cresswell

Self Portrait, by Marti Freidlander with Hugo Manson
reviewed by Cassandra Fusco

Sweeping the Courtyard, by Michael Harlow
reviewed by Patricia Prime

An Unreal House with Real Storms & After Z Hour, by Elizabeth Knox
reviewed by Laura Borrowdale

A little Book of Sonnets, by Julia Leibrich
reviewed by Patricia Prime

Raging around the Zero, by Terry Locke
reviewed by Mary Cresswell

The Rope Walk, by Maria McMillan
reviewed by Olivia Macassey

Tree Space, by Maria McMillan
reviewed by Sue Wootton

New Hokkaido, by James McNaughton
reviewed by Erik Kennedy

The Families, by Vincent O’Sullivan
reviewed by Jane Orchard

Half Dark, by Harry Rickets
reviewed by Patricia Prime

Ko Tautora Te Pito O Toku Ao: A Ngapuhi Narrative, by Hone Sadler
reviewed by Sue Wootton

Sleeping on Horseback, by Frances Samuel
reviewed by Sue Wootton

Grace Joel: an Impressionist Portrait, by Joel L Schiff
reviewed by Cassandra Fusco

There’s a Medical Name for This, by Kerrin P. Sharpe
reviewed by Janet Newman

Parallel, by Jillian Sullivan
reviewed by Mary Cresswell

Fallen Grace, by MaryJane Thomson
reviewed by Patricia Prime

Puna Wai Korero: An Antholgy of Maori Poetry in English, by Reina Whaitiri and Robert Sullivan (eds)
reviewed by Sue Wootton

Diplomatic Ladies: New Zealand’s Unsung envoys, by Joanna Woods
reviewed by Olivia Macassey

Living on Shaky Ground: The science and story of New Zealand’s earthquakes, by Matthew Wright
reviewed by Matthew Hughes

Reviewers

Laura Borrowdale is a Christchurch writer and teacher. Her short stories have appeared in Sport, Bravado and takahē, and she is a regular travel features writer for Kia Ora magazine. Her fiction work frequently draws on childhood and memory, whereas her travel writing is a celebration of discovering new places. Of course, she has a bottom drawer novel, but she’s trying not to think about it right now.

Mary Cresswell is an established poet and science editor. Born in Los Angeles, she moved to New Zealand in 1970. Her poetry has appeared in New Zealand, Australian, Canadian, US and UK literary journals.

Cassandra Fusco is the editor the Reviews sections of takahē. She is also the NZ editor for three international arts journals: Craft Arts International (Sydney), Asian Art News (HK) and World Sculpture News (HK).

Justin Harrison has a strong interest in environmental issues, the arts, poetry and fabtasy and sci-fi genres. He has just completed a trilogy which draws upon and combines these particular concerns.

Matthew Hughes is an Earth and Environmental Scientist, currently working as Canterbury Earthquake Geospatial Research Fellow in the Department of Civil and Natural Resources Engineering at the University of Canterbury. He has a multidisciplinary scientific background encompassing geology, ecology, soil science and climate change, and his current work on natural hazards and disasters focusses on resilient and sustainable cities and communities and, in particular, the impacts of the Christchurch earthquakes on the city’s landscapes and infrastructure. In his spare time Matthew is a voracious reader of history, geopolitics, and indulges in the occasional work of fiction. Matthew is also a volunteer firefighter in his local community of Sumner, Christchurch.

Erik Kennedy‘s poems and reviews have appeared in The Curator, The Morning Star, Oxford Poetry, Poems in Which, The Rumpus, and Sabotage Reviews. Erik studied English at Rutgers and Princeton. He lives in Christchurch and blogs about poetry and poetics for Queen Mob’s Teahouse. Erik is a member of the takahē Board and is the magazine’s Honorary Treasurer.

Olivia Macassey‘s poetry has appeared in various publications including Poetry NZ, Landfall, and Brief. She also writes on cinema and history, and holds a PhD in Film, Television, and Media Studies from the University of Auckland.

Janet Newman is a Master of Creative Writing student at Massey University. Her short stories and poems have been published in takahē and other New Zealand journals. She was a runner-up in the 2012 takahē Poetry Competition, and highly commended in the 2013 Caselberg International Poetry Competition.

Jane Orchard is a health and safety consultant who grows nuts north of Westport and does editing and writing work for a little variety.

Patricia Prime is co-editor of Kokako, reviews/interviews editor of Haibun Today, and writes reviews for several journals including takahē, Gusts and Atlas Poetica. She was one of the editors for the Take Five Tanka Anthologies 2008-2011. She writes haiku, tanka, haibun, tanka prose and renga and has published her poetry worldwide. Her poetry, interviews and reviews have been published in the World Poetry Almanac (Mongolia) from 2009-2012. Patricia is a member of GIEWEC (India) and is on the Advisory Board of the New Fiction Journal (India). Currently Patricia is one of the editors of the World Haiku Anthology, edited by Dr. Bruce Ross, to be published in 2013.

Janet Wainscott lives near Christchurch. Her poetry has appeared in takahē, Bravado and the Christchurch Press. She has been placed in the last two takahē Cultural Studies Essay Competitions. She especially enjoys writing creative non-fiction. Janet is a member of the takahē Board and is the magazine’s Honorary Secretary.

Sue Wootton is a poet and fiction writer whose work has been widely published and anthologised. She is the author of four poetry collections, a children’s book called Cloudcatcher, and a short story collection (The Happiest Music on Earth). Her screenplay Bleat was produced as a short film by Short Film Otago in 2014. She has won several awards for her writing and was the 2008 Robert Burns Fellow at the University of Otago. Sue holds a Master of Arts in Creative Writing from Massey University. Her website is suewootton.com.