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Hunt Ducker poetry competition

To celebrate National Poetry Day 2019, and with our special friends, Forest & Bird, takahē introduces the Hunt Ducker Poetry Competition!

Hunt Ducker? Yeah, Hunt Ducker, because we want your words about New Zealand’s awesome native birds. Celebrate the natural beauty (or the natural comedy) of anything from a pīwakawaka to a kākāpō, an albatross to a fairy tern.

First prize is a year’s membership to Forest & Bird and a year’s subscription to takahē magazine, with your poem shared on social media and considered for publication by both organisations.

Two runners-up will receive takahē subscriptions, their poem shared on social media, and consideration for publication in takahē.

We especially want to hear from new and emerging poets, so don’t be whakamā. Give us a tweet, a chirrup, or a flap about your favourite fowl! Entry is free, and open from 13 July until midnight 22 August 2019.

For full entry details, see our Competitions page. Good luck!

 

 

 

roll up! takahē poetry competition 2018

Entries are now open for the 2018 Takahē Monica Taylor Poetry Prize. This year’s judge is outgoing poetry editor and current Randell Cottage Writer in Residence, poet, novelist, and short story writer, James Norcliffe. As begins his glittering poem, trapeze: 

the thrill is in the possibility...

All poems entered are considered for publication, and for the winner we have a $250 prize and publication in takahē 94, our December print issue.

But the chance will be gone in a sequined flash (entries close Friday 31st August 2018).

Check the Competitions page for the entry form, details, and to read James’s biography. You might also like to read last year’s judges report, or send a query to comps@takahe.org.nz.

Good luck!

Our Short Story Competition ends on November 30th

Thanks to all of you who’ve entered our short story competition. Our judge, Eileen Merriman, is enjoying reading your writing.

To those still working on their stories, we’re looking forward to receiving them. Remember, there is no limit on the number of entries you can submit. For more information do look at our competition page and get writing!

From Crap to Artichoke Tears

We’re lucky enough to have Eileen Merriman judging the Takahē Short Story Competition 2017. Novels aside, her short fiction has been widely published and commended, and appears with prodigious frequency in the Sunday Star-Times Competition, among others. Of course we want to know exactly how she does it.

“The first draft is crap,” she said in a recent interview. It’s something she learned early on in her writing career. See? I told you we were lucky to have her. She knows exactly how much hard work will be going into all the entries to this year’s competition.

If you’re after inspiration for your Takahē entry, read Eileen’s second-placed Bath Flash Fiction Award story, This Is How They Drown. It’s unmissable for its summer-fresh prose and mastery of tension. And don’t miss Artichoke Tears right here in Takahē, for its innovative structure and enduring bittersweetness.

Or, if you’re brewing fresh coffee and stretching your back before launching into another draft before the November 30th deadline, take heart. As Eileen says, “Writing is like anything – you need to put in the hours.”

Use Labour weekend fruitfully- write a short story for us

Thanks to those of you who’ve already submitted a story or two to our 2017 Short Story Competition. And to those of you who haven’t yet entered, a wonderful way to spend the coming weekend would be writing a winning story, or, if you have one that you prepared earlier, honing and editing it to make it your best ever. In other words get writing! I’m looking forward to an avalanche of entries in the coming weeks. You have until November 30th but why wait until the deadline? Look at our competition page for more information and you can find a story written by our judge, Eileen Merriman, in our current on-line issue.

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